Lymes Disease Awareness

Written by eHealth Navigator

A bite from an infected blacklegged tick, also called a deer tick or bear tick, is how humans contract Lyme disease.  The offending tick carries a bacterium that causes Lyme disease.  Anyone can get Lyme disease, but it is most commonly seen in children under the age of 10.

The blacklegged tick can be found in half of all U.S. counties.  The geographic areas with the highest concentrated risk are:

·         Mid-Atlantic to Maine

·         Upper Midwest states

·         Northern California through the Pacific Northwest states

·         Who is at greatest risk?

People who spend recreational time in high-risk areas doing activities such as hiking, off-road biking, horseback riding, fishing and hunting are at the greatest risk.  Other at-risk people include those who work outdoors in high-risk areas in jobs such as construction work, landscaping, forestry, farming, railroad work, land surveying, oil field work and utility line work.

Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

If you live or work in an area where Lyme disease is common and have been bitten by a tick, see a doctor for any of these symptoms:

·         An expanding red rash (bull’s-eye) around the suspected tick bite.

·         Fever

·         Fatigue

·         Headache

Lyme disease can be diagnosed by a blood test in combination with a review of symptoms and a history of a tick bite.  It is easily treated if caught early.  Oral antibiotics taken for a few weeks are often effective.

Protect yourself in high-risk areas

·         Use insect repellents

·         Wear light-colored clothing to make it easier to see ticks.

·         Wear clothing that protects from insects, such as hats, long-sleeve shirts, high boots and pants tucked into socks.

·         Shower following exposure

·         Wash and dry exposed clothing at high temperature settings.

Resources

Search for Lyme diseasde information on these websites:

·         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cdc.gov

·         National Park Service, nps.gov

·        

LymeDisease.org

A bite from an infected blacklegged tick, also called a deer tick or bear tick, is how humans contract Lyme disease.  The offending tick carries a bacterium that causes Lyme disease.  Anyone can get Lyme disease, but it is most commonly seen in children under the age of 10.

The blacklegged tick can be found in half of all U.S. counties.  The geographic areas with the highest concentrated risk are:

·         Mid-Atlantic to Maine

·         Upper Midwest states

·         Northern California through the Pacific Northwest states

·         Who is at greatest risk?

People who spend recreational time in high-risk areas doing activities such as hiking, off-road biking, horseback riding, fishing and hunting are at the greatest risk.  Other at-risk people include those who work outdoors in high-risk areas in jobs such as construction work, landscaping, forestry, farming, railroad work, land surveying, oil field work and utility line work.

Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

If you live or work in an area where Lyme disease is common and have been bitten by a tick, see a doctor for any of these symptoms:

·         An expanding red rash (bull’s-eye) around the suspected tick bite.

·         Fever

·         Fatigue

·         Headache

Lyme disease can be diagnosed by a blood test in combination with a review of symptoms and a history of a tick bite.  It is easily treated if caught early.  Oral antibiotics taken for a few weeks are often effective.

Protect yourself in high-risk areas

·         Use insect repellents

·         Wear light-colored clothing to make it easier to see ticks.

·         Wear clothing that protects from insects, such as hats, long-sleeve shirts, high boots and pants tucked into socks.

·         Shower following exposure

·         Wash and dry exposed clothing at high temperature settings.

Resources

Search for Lyme diseasde information on these websites:

·         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cdc.gov

·         National Park Service, nps.gov

·         LymeDisease.org

 

Last Updated on Monday, 22 May 2017 10:04PM